Pumpkin Turkey Chili

Pumpkin Turkey Chili

This is my all-time favorite fall recipe, as it’s a twist on a classic and serves as delicious comfort food. I used this original recipe from Larissa Another Day blog and put my own twist on it (along with J.P.’s influence). I’ve been making it every fall, at least 2-3 times per season, for the last 6 years now. The pumpkin puree and spices are very subtle, so they don’t alter the traditional chili flavor profile too much. If anything, they ADD creaminess and warmth to the dish. I hope you enjoy it as much as we do!

Servings: 4

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 70 minutes

Total time: 75 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 chopped yellow onion
  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 Tbsp cumin powder
  • 1 Tbsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp pumpkin spice
  • 1 cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 1 cup bone broth
  • 1 can kidney beans
  • 1 can pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup hot sauce
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • Optional toppings: sour cream, goat cheese (or another variety), chopped jalape√Īos, cilantro, green onions

Instructions

  1. Warm a large stock pot over medium heat. Add olive oil, followed by the chopped yellow onion. Toss to coat and cook for 2 minutes.
  2. Add ground turkey and spices. Cook for 6 more minutes, or until turkey is nearly cooked (but not all the way). Occasionally break up and stir.
  3. Add halved grape tomatoes (or can of diced tomatoes). Cook for 2 minutes, stirring as needed.
  4. Add the bone broth, kidney beans, pumpkin puree, and hot sauce. Stir until combined. Bring to a boil then simmer, covered, for 60 minutes.
  5. Serve 1 cup with toppings of choice (goat cheese is incredible!), then sprinkle with black pepper.
  6. Cozy up, put on a fall flick, and enjoy every bite!

Let me know what you think please! I value your feedback on my work and recipes, as I want to grow and adapt as needed. Thank you for the follow and read!

All my best, ‚̧ Danielle

5 Nutrients That Support Your Menstrual Phase

5 Nutrients That Support Your Menstrual Phase

Let me be clear. All nutrients are beneficial and serve their purpose at different times. I am also a big proponent of individualized nutrition based on what a person’s specific needs are. With that said, these 5 nutrients are my personal findings and round up of what can help most women with various symptoms during their menstrual phase.

Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral that has been shown to reduce symptoms for both PMS and menopause. During your luteal and menstrual phases, a magnesium supplement, foods rich in magnesium, and even magnesium oil or lotion can help relax the smooth muscles of your uterus, decrease inflammatory prostaglandins (the hormone-like lipids that cause contractions and cramps), reduce headaches and breast tenderness, and even help curb sugar cravings.

In terms of hormonal balance, magnesium is needed for the production of TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone, which is responsible for your body’s metabolism. In addition, it aids in blood sugar balance and estrogen detoxification. Women with PCOS are 19 times more likely to be magnesium-deficient, and those with diabetes or an autoimmune disease are also at high risk for deficiency.

Women want to aim for 400mg of magnesium per day.

Here are some food sources rich in magnesium: 

  • pumpkin seeds
  • almonds
  • spinach
  • cashews
  • soymilk
  • black beans
  • edamame
  • dark chocolate

As for supplements, magnesium in the forms of aspartate, citrate, lactate, and chloride are more bioavailable and readily absorbed than magnesium oxide and sulfate. I was just recommended magnesium oil from Ancient Minerals and will report back after a few months of using it.

Omega 3s

Omega 3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with bloating, uterine inflammation, migraines, and even mood swings. In a study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome and irregular periods, an omega 3 supplement was given at 3g/day for 8 weeks. This resulted in decreased elevated testosterone and androgen levels with a regulation of menses in the omega 3 group.

In another study, women took 1,000mg of fish oil/day. The experimental group reported less menstrual pain than the comparative group who took the pain reliever, ibuprofen.

Here are some food sources rich in omega-3s: 

  • fish (salmon, tuna, herring, sardines, and mackerel)
  • nuts and seeds
  • fortified foods (I have been using this Silk oat, almond, and pea milk blend infused with DHA omega-3s!)

Zinc

Supplementing with 30mg of zinc 1-3x daily during your luteal and menstrual phases can significantly reduce (if not manage or eradicate dysmenorrhea- period pain!). Zinc can also block androgen production, such as testosterone, which helps in treating acne and reducing excess facial hair.

Here are some food sources rich in zinc: 

  • oysters
  • shellfish (crab and lobster)
  • red meat (I recommend organic, grass fed and pasture-raised)
  • legumes
  • nuts and seeds- especially pumpkin seeds!
  • eggs
  • whole grains

B vitamins, specifically B6 and B12

It’s a toss up between which B vitamin is more important to focus on. Both B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 (cobalamin) can help reduce feelings of anxiety and depression, which as we know can be rampant during our luteal and menstrual phases. Here are the main contributors of each.

B6 can help regulate periods, so if your cycle is irregular, I would recommend incorporating foods that contain more of this B vitamin. B6 also helps minimize bloating and has the ability to produce amino acids, which is needed more during your bleed for replenishment and to avoid muscle catabolism.

Here are some food sources rich in B6: 

  • pork.
  • poultry, such as¬†chicken¬†or turkey
  • some fish (cod, salmon, halibut, trout, tuna and snapper)
  • peanuts
  • soy¬†beans
  • wheatgerm
  • oats
  • bananas

B12 largely contributes to red blood cell formation, which is also crucial during this time.Since we are losing blood and iron, new red blood cells are needed to help carry oxygen throughout the body and keep energy levels high.

Here are some food sources rich in B12: 

  • meat
  • poultry
  • fish
  • eggs milk

Iron

Last but not least is iron. About 70% of our body’s iron is found in red blood cells. When we bleed during menses, we lose blood and, therefore, red blood cells and iron. It is important to replenish this mineral, as to avoid iron depletion or anemia. Women need approximately 1.8 mg of iron/day. If you donate blood, you lose about 200 mg of iron, and those breastfeeding and postpartum can lose up to 700 mg. Breastfeeding mamas need to increase their iron intake by 0.5-1mg/day.

P.S. Iron is better absorbed in the company of vitamin C, so add peppers, citrus juice, broccoli or tomatoes to your meals with iron-containing foods. Using iron pots can also increase iron levels! We only absorbed 10-30% of iron, so keep that in mind when measuring and accounting for your food. 

Here are some food sources rich in iron: 

  • lean beef
  • veal
  • poultry
  • pork
  • lamb
  • liver
  • fish and shellfish
  • greens
  • tofu
  • lima beans
  • legumes and lentils

Summary

Upping your nutrient consumption game is a great strategy in preventing or treating PMS and menstrual symptoms. From the abundance of research I’ve been doing lately on women’s health (specifically nutrition and phases of the cycle), I found magnesium, omega 3s, zinc, B vitamins (B6 + B12), and iron to be some of the most crucial in alleviating unwanted cramps, headaches, lethargy, acne and more while also replenishing the body with the fuel it needs to process and recover best.

If you have basic nutrition questions, I can answer those for you, but hang on tight for when I become licensed in February to better serve your personal needs. Xo Danielle

Disclaimer: The medical/health information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind of medical/health advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATION IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

 

How to Start Cycle Syncing

I discussed what cycle syncing was in my last post, but now I’m sure you’re wondering how to get started. Here are my top 5 tips on how to live according to your cycle without overcomplicating things.

  1. Read Alisa Vitti’s “In the Flo” book. This book is what sparked my interest in women’s health and biohacking your hormones .It’s a fairly easy read and account of how women are neglected in terms of diet and exercise advice compared to men (which many studies are based on). *hard eye roll*
  2. Take up seed cycling. Seed cycling is eating sunflower seeds and sesame seeds during your luteal and menstrual phases (the week before and of your period) and eating pumpkin and flax seeds during your follicular and ovulatory phases. These seeds contain phytoestrogens and other specific micronutrients that support your hormones during these phases. It is recommended to eat these seeds raw and to consume 1-2 Tbsp/day. *more on this in an upcoming post
  3. Exercise according to each phase.
    • Follicular phase: cardio
    • Ovulatory phase: HIIT, weight lifting, circuits
    • Luteal phase: pilates, yoga
    • Menstruation: walking, restorative yoga (Yoga With Adrienne on YouTube has a killer Yoga for Women sequence that helps ease cramps!)

*Each phase fluctuates in estrogen and progesterone levels, ultimately providing different levels of energy. This guide can help you give your body the grace and movement it thrives off of during each phase. Note: afternoon workouts are best as to avoid spiking cortisol levels.

4.¬†Eat more whole foods in general. If you read “In the Flo”, you’ll notice that nearly all of the foods recommended are whole foods. Whole foods contain more fiber, active enzymes, antioxidants, and micronutrients that support your reproductive and overall health. Aim to consume 2-3 fruits per day and 3-4 veggies/day, along with whole food proteins, healthy fats, and whole grains. *Those with PCOS or endometriosis should consult with a Registered Dietitian to set up a plan specific to their needs.

5. Eat or drink 1 fermented food per day! Good gut health impacts nearly every other bodily system. 80% of our immune cells are found within the GI tract. Eating healthy fats can result in glowing skin for our integumentary system, and a diverse microbiome encourages regular bowel movements. The list goes on and on. In relation to reproductive health, when gut health is rich in diversity, the estorbolome (what regulates estrogen) is also balanced and can maintain normal levels of this sex hormone. If the estrobolome is disrupted with dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) and inflammation, it strains its efficiency to maintain estrogen homeostasis.

Summary

Cycle syncing can be as simple or complex as you make it. I started out with these 5 changes listed above before diving into eating specific foods for each phase. With the stresses of everyday life, it can be difficult to take on new challenges and create new habits. Believe me, I know. Take on what amount is right for you, and remember, small changes add up!

What questions do you have? Leave a comment or message me on Instagram to discuss if you’d like. Happy syncing!

An Intro to Cycle Syncing

Hello! I realize that while I introduced cycle syncing on my Instagram account, I have yet to dedicate an entire post to it on my blog. For those of you who are not familiar, cycle syncing is coordinating your diet, exercise, and other lifestyle regimens along with your menstrual cycle and its 4 phase components (follicular, ovulatory, luteal, and menstrual). The idea is to “balance” your hormones in order to create homeostasis throughout your body, lessen unfavorable side effects (such as mood swings, cramps, headaches, etc.), and optimize your energy and potential!

Did you know that hormones affect more than just your reproductive system? Hormones are what control our appetite, metabolism, blood sugar, blood pressure, and many other bodily functions. They are essentially chemical messengers that activate other activities within the body, which is why it is so important for them to be produced and secreted within their appropriate levels. Diet and exercise can help with this, hence, cycle syncing.

“Cycle syncing” is a term that was coined by Alisa Vitti, author of Woman Code and In the Flo. She is a functional nutritionist, Holistic Health Counselor (HHC), and member of the American Association of Drugless Practitioners (AADP). In other words, she knows her stuff. Alisa is the founder of FLOLiving and runs a virtual practice. She, in conjunction with other women’s health practitioners, have initiated this liberation and revolution of women speaking freely and openly about their cycles and hormones. We should be encouraging one another to live in sync with our bodies and cycles.

Does cycle syncing work?

While there are no specific studies on cycle syncing as a cohesive practice, eating specific foods and altering the type of exercises done in accordance with your menstrual phases has shown promising results. For example, ground and raw flaxseed meal contains phytoestrogens that have shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer due to its mild estrogenic effects. In addition, multiple studies have been done in relation to exercise and the menstrual cycle. While there are not always significant differences between phases, the mid-luteal (the week leading up to your period) has displayed a decrease in performance in the heat among athletes.

The short of it is that cycle syncing is still being researched as a tried and true practice; However, a healthy and balanced diet along with a change in various exercises isn’t going to harm anyone in the meantime. With that said, please work with a professional while changing your diet if you have a medical condition or if you are looking to lose weight or balance your hormones.

I hope you enjoyed this quick snippet of an intro on cycle syncing! Stay tune for detailed info on my next post “Cycle Syncing 101”.

The Vanishing Period

This is the story of losing and regaining my period. I am sharing this tale in the hopes that my story will resonate with a friend or follower who currently doesn’t experience her monthly bleed. I challenge that woman to take an interest in reclaiming that power and health. You can also read along if you’re simply interested, for whatever reason. ūüėČ

The Beginning

My first “visit” arrived in the 5th or 6th grade. I really can’t pinpoint my age, but I do remember calling for my mom from the bathroom while still sitting on the toilet. “Mom, I got my period!”. She entered the room, looked at me sympathetically and said, “Okay, no big deal!”, then handed me a pad. I know she was just trying to make me feel comfortable, but I couldn’t help feeling awkward and unsure about becoming a “woman”. Little did I know I wouldn’t become a “woman” again until I was nearly 30…

The Vanishing

As far as I remember, I had normal, light periods throughout junior high and high school. Although, I’d be surprised if I didn’t experience anovulation (sporadic missed periods due to not ovulating) here and there. Fast forward to late college though- I’m managing a salon, attending classes full-time, and paying private out-of-pocket tuition all by myself. I wasn’t sleeping well, maybe 4-5 hours a night at best. On top of all of this, I was barely eating. I recall going through a phase of only consuming 1 plain packet of oatmeal for breakfast (made with water), working a 12 hour shift, then maybe having a snack before bed. I was starved and stressed, and so was my reproductive system (the last thing on my mind at the time).

This chronic stress caused me to develop hypothalamic amenorrhea (the absence of your period for 3+ months due to hypothalamus insufficiencies). I didn’t think much about my missing period. Heck, I thought it was kind of awesome not getting one in my early 20s. I didn’t have to buy tampons, so I saved money there. I also escaped the monthly woes of the dreaded bleed, including mood swings, cramps, breakouts, cravings, etc. Bonus points for not having to worry about it interfering with sex! Hey-o! Not getting a period was great, or so I thought.

A Story Within a Story

I met my husband in the winter of 2011. We did long distance from Chicago to Nashville for about a year, and then I moved to Tennessee to be with him. In the following years, I started training for marathons. Boy did I love running and the stress release it provided. In fact, I still do. When training for and running my first marathon, I could barely finish due to under fueling. I was incredibly tired and drained. Plus, my recovery was killer from the lack of nutrients and depletion. I’m actually shocked I didn’t injure myself that first training cycle, especially because amenorrhea can have adverse effects on bone density (something I wasn’t aware of or cared about at the time).

As my training and experience progressed throughout my 9 marathon training cycles, I came to realize that I was not going to get faster without proper fueling. This realization, a couple of injuries, and the desire to recover from my eating disorder made me dive deep into nutrition research, ¬†purchase my favorite “Run Fast. Eat Slow.” cookbook, and it even inspired me to major in nutrition & dietetics! ūüôā

I proceeded to learn how to properly fuel my body and ALL of its systems with what it needs- macro + micronutrient- wise. I gained a bit of weight, and guess what? I ran my fastest race and qualified for the Boston Marathon! In April 2019, I PRed at Boston with a 3:21.. Do you know what else? I had regained my period a couple of years prior leading up to that, which I attribute to my bone health, injury prevention, hormonal balance, increased energy levels, a quicker recovery time and improved athletic performance. Regaining my period was a blessing in disguise, and I never take its presence for granted now. Here’s more info on Why You Shouldn’t Dread Your Period, and to even embrace it for what it’s doing for you, your overall health, and your ability to conceive if you so wish.

The Takeaway

What I have learned from my hypothalamic amenorrhea was that just because it didn’t appear to be doing damage, the absence of a period can cause long-term health consequences. These consequences include, but are not limited to: infertility, osteopenia or osteoporosis, thyroid issues, adrenal disorders, PCOS, and hormonal imbalances. I was lucky that my running injuries were fairly minor and that I didn’t suffer any stress fractures. The plan is to get a DEXA scan to check my bone density. I’m hoping there is no serious damage or signs of onset osteopenia/osteoporosis.

While amenorrhea occurs naturally while pregnant and breastfeeding, it should be taken seriously as a health concern when caused by an eating disorder, extreme exercise, being underweight, medications, stress, and sometimes birth control (among other causes). Many OBGYNs claim that there is nothing wrong with the absence of a period while on birth control, but I strongly suggest that you educate yourself on how birth control works and what that means for your body. For example, hormonal birth control suppresses ovulation (an entire phase of your cycle) and therefore induces a “withdrawal bleed” during your placebo week. In other words, you are not getting a real period on birth control. This is something to think about.

My last message about amenorrhea is to not take it lightly like I did in my early 20s. Having the mentality that you are saving money on sanitary products, avoiding period symptoms, and changing the game with your lifestyle and sex schedule can be detrimental and negligent to your long-term health. I know it is difficult to adopt a new perspective after learning new information, but I promise you it’s worth the investment in yourself and your health. If anything, do me a favor and educate yourself, continue to learn, then make changes that are right for you and your body.

Please feel free to reach out without questions regarding amenorrhea, and check out my previous post, “I Don’t Have a Period. Now What?“.

 

Disclaimer: The medical/health information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind of medical/health advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATION IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

 

 

All About Birth Control

There is more buzz than ever about whether or not birth control is our best friend or worst enemy. Instead of taking advice from general blanket statements or a social media influencer with no credentials whatsoever, let’s take a step back to reevaluate. I am going to do my best with writing an unbiased, factual article about the pros & cons of birth control and whether or not it may be right for YOU. Remember, you are the ultimate decision-maker of and advocate for your own health and its fate.

The History of The Pill

The pill, also known as oral contraceptive, was released in May of 1950. When it was made available, it was illegal for physicians to prescribe it for pregnancy prevention and chalked it up to helping regulate menstruation and “cycle control”. Crazy right? ¬†Oh, and you also had to be married to avoid promiscuity. *smh* It wasn’t until the late 60s/early 70s that birth control (bc) was marketed and prescribed as a contraceptive.¬Ļ

The pill revolutionized how women perceived and approached sex, as they had more freedom to engage in intercourse with more reliable preventative measures. This isn’t to say that you can’t get pregnant while on the pill, because you can, but the chances are slim to none if you take it routinely. The pill is 99% effective in preventing pregnancies when taken everyday at the same time. This number drops to 91% when a pill or more is missed, resulting in 9 out of 100 women getting pregnant this way a year.¬≤

How it Works

Birth control releases hormones into your bloodstream, ultimately preventing an egg from being released from your ovaries. This process is called ovulation, and it is essential for pregnancy to occur. This means your menstrual bleed on the pill is truly not a period because your body doesn’t experience ovulation. It is simply the shedding of your uterine wall lining due to a dip in hormones during your placebo week.¬≥

The Pill’s Contents

So, there are a variety of brands with different levels of hormones present. The most common form contains both estrogen and progestin (hormones that are inversely correlated and counteract one another). Another form contains just progestin. This type of “mini” pill is for women who experience side effects with estrogen dosing.¬≥

Other Forms of BC

  1. The pill. We’ve already discussed this common form of bc. You take the pill everyday, with one week being a set of placebo pills (they do not contain hormones) that call forth your “menstrual bleed” from a significant decrease in hormones.
  2. The shot. Administered by your doctor every 3 months, the shot (aka Depo-Provera) injects a front load of progestin.‚Āī Women like receiving the shot every 3 months for convenience. A perk is that it does not contain estrogen. Two downsides of receiving the shot are an increased risk of osteoporosis due to lower bone density and infertility for up to 10 months after receiving your last injection.‚ĀĶ
  3. The patch. The patch is worn for 21 days then taken off to trigger a “menstrual bleed”. It releases estrogen and progestin in small doses and is 91% effective in preventing pregnancy.‚Ā∂
  4. The ring. The¬†Nuvaring is a flexible ring inserted in the vaginal canal. It stays there for 21 days, slowly releasing both estrogen and progestin. When you remove it at day 21, well you know by now- you initiate a bleed. The ring can fall out at different times, including sex, so you must be careful. It is 91% effective in preventing pregnancy when it is used correctly.‚Ā∑
  5. Condoms, diaphragms, sponges, and cervical caps. These options are all physically and hormone-free options for birth control. Most of us are familiar with condoms and the fact that they can tear. Diaphragms, sponges, and cervical caps are all used by females and inserted in the vaginal canal to block sperm from entering the fallopian tubes.
  6. Intrauterine Devices (IUDs). IUDs come in two forms: copper and hormonal. The hormonal version releases progestin and consists of the brands Mirena, Liletta, Skyla, and ParaGard. Both are inserted in the uterus through the cervix by a medical professional. Insertion complications can occur, including cramping, rejection (the IUD coming out), along with pain. However, women opt for this option because of its convenience, low maintenance, longevity (ranges from 3-10 years), effectiveness (99.8% effective!), and being able to have it while breastfeeding. The turn around for getting pregnant if one so wishes is fairly quick too.
  7. Natural Rhythmic Method. This method is tracking your cycle to determine when you are ovulating. A few days leading up to, during, and after ovulation are when you can get pregnant. A home fertility test can help affirm this.
  8. Sterilization.¬†An extreme form of birth control is sterilization. This is when women get their fallopian tubes tied to prevent sperm from swimming upstream to fertilize an egg. For men, this means a vasectomy, a minor surgery that blocks sperm as well. Both procedures can be revisable, depending on the approach and method done, but it can be expensive, painful, and unreliable.‚Āł

The Pros of Hormonal Birth Control

  1. It can help regulate your period.
  2. It can alleviate cramping, PMS, PMDD, and other menstrual symptoms.
  3. It can clear up acne.
  4. It decreases your risk of developing uterine cancer.
  5. It helps manage endometriosis.
  6. It can reduce the risk of anemia.‚ĀĻ

The Cons of Hormonal Birth Control

  1. You are not experiencing a true menstrual bleed. The hormones in birth control prevent ovulation, an entire phase of the menstrual cycle. Reference “Why You Shouldn’t Dread Your Period” post.
  2. It may cause amenorrhea, absence of a bleed altogether.
  3. It may cause hormonal imbalances.
  4. It increases your risk of blood clots.
  5. It increases risk of cardiovascular disease complications.¬Ļ‚Āį

Risk Factors

According to Mayo Clinic, risk factors/contraindications for taking birth control include if you:

  1. “Are a smoker age 35 or older
  2. Have just given birth
  3. Have a blood-clotting disorder, uncontrolled high blood pressure, certain heart or blood vessel problems, breast cancer, certain liver problems, gallbladder disease, migraines with aura, lupus, prolonged diabetes or complications from diabetes”¬Ļ‚Āį

*I also feel obligated to note that birth control does not protect you against STDs.

Summary  

So there you have it- a concise overview of all things birth control. We covered the pill’s history and makeup, your options of bc, and its pros and cons. I hope I delivered the unbiased facts for all of you women and did you justice in terms of feeling empowered and knowledgeable. My aim is to feed you science-base information so you can make the best decisions for you, your body, and your health. I am here as support along the way, and can offer my counseling services next spring to help you feel and function optimally. Be well! Xo Danielle

Disclaimer: The medical/health information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind of medical/health advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATION IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Resources

1.Liao, P., & Dollin, J. (2012, December). Half a century of the oral contraceptive pill: Historical review and view to the future. Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3520685/

2. Parenthood, P. (n.d.). What is the Effectiveness of Birth Control Pills? Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/birth-control/birth-control-pill/how-effective-is-the-birth-control-pill

3. Birth control pills: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007460.htm

4. 18th, A. (n.d.). Birth-Control-Depo-Provera-vs-Patch Archives. Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://www.cdlsusa.org/ask-the-expert/birth-control-depo-provera-vs-patch/

5. Holland, K. (1982, October 27). Birth Control Pill vs. Birth Control Shot: Pros and Cons. Retrieved August 06, 2020, from https://www.healthline.com/health/birth-control/birth-control-pill-vs-shot

6. Birth control patch. (2019, January 26). Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/birth-control-patch/about/pac-20384553

7. Team, T. (2068, May 30). Vaginal Ring for Birth Control. Retrieved August 06, 2020, from https://www.healthline.com/health/birth-control-vaginal-ring

8. What birth control method is right for you? (2019, February 14). Retrieved August 05, 2020, from https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/birth-control-methods

9. Osborn, C. (2037, June 25). Benefits of Birth Control: 10 Advantages Beyond Preventing Pregnancy. Retrieved August 06, 2020, from https://www.healthline.com/health/birth-control-benefits

10. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/birth-control/expert-answers/birth-control-pills/faq-20058110

 

Why You Shouldn’t Dread Your Period

A period- something found at the end of a sentence or at the end of a menstrual cycle. *Ugh* is what every woman just said in their head after reading that sentence. If your exasperation was audible, then you are probably all too familiar with the woes of the red monster. But what if we reframed how we felt about our period and took control of our experience with it? Hear me out.

Our period is a sign of reproductive health, so much so that the¬†American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) has proposed clinicians should consider one’s menstruation as the fifth vital sign (along with body temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure).¬Ļ Whoa. That’s a bold statement. This tells us that there’s something to be said about the presence of a healthy period.

Amenhorrea is the opposite- the absence of your period. It naturally occurs during pregnancy, while breastfeeding, and when menopause occurs. Additional causes of amenhorrea could be birth control (another great blog post to come) and other medications, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and blood pressure drugs. Structural abnormalities can also cause issues with menstruation.

If a woman has amenhorrea at any other time, this indicates an underlying issue. Whether its a hormonal imbalance, weight concerns (over or underweight), nutrition deficiencies, overexercising, or stress, something is causing either anovulation (when no egg is released during ovulation) or a skipped menses. ²

Aside from the obvious sign of a missed period, some other signs and symptoms that accompany this include:

  • hair loss
  • headaches
  • vision changes
  • facial hair
  • pelvic pain
  • acne
  • nipple discharge¬†¬≤

Now, after learning that getting your period is HEALTHY and considered the fifth pillar of female health, are you beginning to appreciate its presence more? What about the fact that having your period indicates you are reproductively equipped to reproduce should you so desire? Yes, I completely understand and respect that not all women want children (I might be one of them!), but the fact that our bodies are staying healthy enough for ourselves and that option is incredible.

Benefits of Having a Period

  • reproductive health
  • bone health (hormones aid in maintaining bone density)
  • thyroid & adrenal health
  • being able to track your cycle and leverage you energy levels, creativity, sex drive, and more!
  • you can better understand and make sense of your emotional state¬†¬≥

If you do not have a period at the moment. Don’t fret. Contact your primary care physician and OB to rule out any medical condition, then turn to your diet and other lifestyle choices to help the return of the red sea. ūüėČ

So, after reading this, do you appreciate what us women tend to demonize? Reframe and take control ladies! Your period is normal, natural and something to be talked about and celebrated, not shunned!

Disclaimer: The medical/health information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind of medical/health advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATION IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

References

  1. Vartan, S. (2020, March 16). Doctors Think Your Period Should Be a Fifth Vital Sign. Retrieved July 30, 2020, from https://elemental.medium.com/doctors-think-your-period-should-be-a-fifth-vital-sign-5b882c864783
  2. Amenorrhea. (2019, July 25). Retrieved July 30, 2020, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/amenorrhea/symptoms-causes/syc-20369299
  3. Network, W. (n.d.). Health benefits of regular menstrual periods. Retrieved July 30, 2020, from https://www.womenshealthnetwork.com/pms-and-menstruation/health-benefits-regular-periods.aspx

 

Let’s Talk About PMS.

PMS. It is the dreaded acronym to every woman who has ever experienced it. PMS stands for Premenstrual Syndrome. It is a condition that can alter your emotional, mental, physiological AND physical states. Did you know that PMS symptoms are not normal? I didn’t either up until this past year. I bought into the story we’re told as young girls that PMS is part of it all. This is FALSE! Think about it. Our bodies are so intricately designed to perform on an optimal cellular level to keep us alive. Why would it fail us when it comes to reproductive health?

Pre-, meaning before, and menstrual, meaning your period, means that PMS is experienced the week leading up to your bleed. Signs and symptoms can range from mood swings to extreme physical discomfort. Refer to the list below for the slew of possible signs and symptoms.

Signs & Symptoms of PMS

  • mood swings
  • anxiety
  • irritability
  • bloating
  • acne
  • abdominal pain or discomfort
  • sore breasts
  • food cravings
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • heightened senses to light, smell, taste
  • skin sensitivity
  • fatigue
  • trouble sleeping
  • depression
  • behavioral changes¬Ļ

*Among many others. PMS has been associated with nearly 200 hundred signs and symptoms! Every woman experiences this differently.

On average, 47.8% of women experience chronic PMS symptoms. The highest recorded prevalence rate was 98%.²

These numbers are staggeringly high for a syndrome that shouldn’t be making an appearance at all, let alone every 21 days. So what is the cause of PMS that is plaguing women on a global scale?

Possible Causes of PMS

  • hormonal fluctuations/imbalances
  • neurotransmitter changes
  • anemia
  • endometriosis
  • thyroid disease
  • irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • connective tissue or rheumatologic diseases¬Ļ
  • eating disorders
  • vitamin or mineral deficiencies

Ways To Treat Symptoms

  1. First and foremost, you know I’m going to suggest reevaluating your diet. Removing or minimizing fast food, foods high in sodium and saturated fats, sugar, caffeine and alcohol should be your first move. It doesn’t sound fun, but let’s focus on what you can ADD to your diet. Adding foods that are rich in magnesium, calcium, and B vitamins have been shown to reduce PMS symptoms.

These foods include:

  • dark chocolate (woohoo! Just make sure it’s over 70% and low in sugar)
  • avocado
  • spinach
  • almonds
  • sunflower seeds
  • salmon
  • wheat germ
  • black cohosh (a medicinal root, also found as a supplement, shown in some studies to help relieve menopause and PMS symptoms)
  • low-sugar yogurt
  • citrus fruits
  • bananas
  • brown rice
  • shellfish
  • legumes

Just to name a few…

2. Secondly, moving your body can help relieve symptoms, boost endorphins, and even metabolize excess estrogen that could be the culprit of some symptoms. Walking or doing light yoga is ideal during this time of your cycle, but you choose a form of movement that feels good for you.

3. Drunk up, buttercup! Staying hydrated can help with bloating, water retention, and abdominal pain. Aim to drink 1mL for every calorie you consume, or from 1,500-2,000mL (1.5-2L) per day.

4. Mayo Clinic suggests acupuncture as an alternative treatment to relieve symptoms.¬≥ (I can’t wait to try this).

5. Reduce stress to decrease cortisol levels, which has an effect on blood sugar and insulin levels. One again, stress management looks different for every individual. Pick a few ways to manage stress that works FOR YOU.

6. Catch those Zzz’s! I’ve said it in many other posts, but sleep is so very important in our overall health and wellbeing. It’s the third pillar of health after diet & exercise. Sleep is when our brains detoxify, which can affect our neurotransmitters! If you recall, neurotransmitter changes (such as a dip in serotonin and dopamine levels) can be one of the root causes of PMS.

6. If holistic measures do not work for you, talking to a doctor about antidepressants, NSAIDs, or diuretics may help those with underlying issues and severe conditions.

Conclusion

If you’ve experienced PMS symptoms and do not want to live with these predictable symptoms anymore, try some of these remedies out. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions. I am happy to help, and keep in mind that I’ll be accepting nutrition clients come next Feb/March to help alleviate these issues through food!

Take care. Be safe, and stay healthy, friends! ‚̧

Disclaimer: The medical/health information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind of medical/health advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITE OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATION IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

References

  1. Higuera, V. (2027, June 05). Premenstrual Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments. Retrieved July 29, 2020, from https://www.healthline.com/health/premenstrual-syndrome
  2. A DM, K S, A D, Sattar K. Epidemiology of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study [published correction appears in J Clin Diagn Res. 2015 Jul;9(7):ZZ05]. J Clin Diagn Res. 2014;8(2):106-109. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2014/8024.4021
  3. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). (2020, February 07). Retrieved July 29, 2020, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/premenstrual-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20376780

Quinn’s Popcorn

Quinn’s Popcorn

It’s Friday, and that means movie night and popcorn! JP and I always like using Fridays to wind down from the week and feel refreshed for the weekend adventures ahead.

I have very fond memories of my grandma making stovetop popcorn in this old copper pot. She used raw kernels and olive oil to pop the kernels, and then added parmesean and sea salt. OMG, it was divine chomping on that watching Tales of the Crypt lol. Anyone my age remember that terrifying show? Anyways…

I can still taste the flavor of her popcorn. You know, the way you have taste memories of how your mom or grandma makes their recipe. It never turns out the same if anyone else makes it, even following the recipe to a T. I haven’t attempted making it her way, for this reason and because I just never thought to try it or buy popcorn kernels! Now I just might.

This is how I decided to try Quinns popcorn though. They’re a snack company that is dedicated to providing real foods that are non-GMO and are wrapped up in chemical-free packaging. Did you know that most traditional microwave poppcorn bags contain cancer-causing chemicals?! Ugh, yes.

I have written a review on their popcorn product, specifically their Aged Parmesan Rosemary. It is the only popcorn I will buy that is prepackaged because their bags do not contain carcinogens and their popcorn additives are not fake and processed crap!

On a scale of 1-10 with explanations, here’s what I rated each category.

Texture: 9/10

I mean, the mouthfeel is that of popcorn- light and slightly crunchy- the perfect consistency for a snack or light meal (insert: Olivia Pope vibes with red wine). I wish the popcorn itself was a little….what’s the word…sturdier…to pack more of a crunch. Does that make sense? Like I feel that movie theatre popcorn (while I don’t love the gallons of butter and fake additives) is durable with each popped kernel. For that reason, texture receives a 9/10.

 

Flavor: 8.5/10

Think popcorn. aged parmesan. rosemary. and salt- YUMMMM! Simple ingredients with nothing you can’t pronounce. I am obsessed with a hint of cheese and herbs in my meals, and salt always elevates those flavors. I usually add freshly grated Parmesan on top too, because the flavor is a bit stronger. I deducted a point from flavor for this reason, because while their cheese is non-GMO and from a cow that has not been treated with antibiotics nor hormones, it’s not as strong as fresh parm. Of course, I couldn’t expect it to be without being refrigerated. I also wish there was a touch more salt, so I knocked off another half point for that, but adding a dash of sea salt is an easy fix. ūüėČ Overall, it’s tasty!

 

Nutrition Profile: 10/10

Calories: 510 kcal / bag (170 kcals / serving with 3 servings in each bag)

Fat: 6g/bag‚Äď factoring in the sunflower oil it comes with, so to be expected

Carbs: 51g/bag ‚Äď as expected

Protein: 12g/bag ‚Äď better than expected for popcorn!

Fiber: 9g/bag ‚Äď woohoo! Get that fiber! Goal is usually 25g;day for women, 38g/day for men

Added sugars: 0g ‚Äď yusssss honey!

*Plus, vitamin A 2%, vitamin C and iron 4% of your daily valueūüôā

Here’s a screenshot of the ingredients:

Screen Shot 2020-07-24 at 4.44.41 PM

I am LOVING how short this ingredient list is! And please note that not all sunflower oils are made equal. While I typically prefer olive oil, high oleic sunflower oil contains more monounsaturated fats than polyunsaturated fats- more of the type of fat we want in our diet and that olive oil also consists of! I gave the nutrition profile a 10/10 because it’s macros and micros are pretty impressive compared to other popcorn brands.

Click here to check out all of where Quinn’s Snacks ingredients are sourced from. As you’ll see when exploring, they offer many flavors of popcorn and GF sorghum pretzels too! I can’t wait to try those…

 

Cost: 9.5/10

You can buy a 3-pack of this popcorn on Amazon for $13.17 rn, so it’s roughly $4/box with 2 bags in each. I’ve seen popcorn for cheaper, but I think paying an extra buck or two is worth the company being so transparent with where they source their quality ingredients from.

 

Overall Score: 9/10!

 

All in all, I would highly recommend checking out Quinn’s Snacks! They care about the packaging they use because they care about their consumers! They want to provide a safe, healthy and delicious snack that still represents classic foods we’re familiar with. I always purchase my Quinn’s popcorn at Target, but you can also find them on Amazon and use their store finder to find a retailer that carries them near you.

Happy snacking!

Estrogen Dominance: What Is It, and What Can I Do About It?

Estrogen dominance. It’s a term used to describe elevated estrogen levels within the body, for females or males. Estrogen dominance can also imply normal levels of estrogen in comparison to lower levels of progesterone at times throughout the menstrual cycle when progesterone is supposed to be the dominant sex hormone.

Signs and Symptoms of High Estrogen (for women):

  • irregular periods
  • bloating
  • weight gain
  • fatigue
  • difficulty sleeping
  • breast tenderness
  • mood swings
  • anxiety
  • hair loss
  • low libido
  • benign cysts¬†development in breasts
  • heightened PMS symptoms
  • headaches
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • cold hand or feet
  • memory issues ¬Ļ

Signs and Symptoms of High Estrogen (for men):

  • breast tenderness
  • breast enlargement
  • infertility
  • erectile dysfunction¬Ļ

These symptoms, especially a collection of them, are indicative of elevated estrogen. I always suggest contacting you primary care physician or OB to get a hormone analysis done to confirm this, but you can also tackle this issue with holistic approaches.

Holistic Approaches:

  1. Move more! Exercise aids in estrogen metabolism by releasing it from fat cells. Don’t worry. It’s not necessary to partake in vigorous exercise if that isn’t your style. Simply adding steps to your day (a common goal is 10,000 steps) works wonders in the long run.
  2. Try to avoid xenoestrogens, chemical compounds that mimic estrogen and cause endocrine disruption. Endocrines are glands that release these hormones, so if you have chemicals in your body that block or impair endocrine gland function, then your hormones will surely be out of wack. Xenoestrogens are found in plastic water bottles and food containers, beauty and cleaning products, and sunscreen (just to name a few). Do some research and buy brands with labels that say non-toxic and plant-based on them. Decreasing your toxic-load can do wonders!
  3. Chill out! Find things that help you relax and works for you. A sheet mask might sound idyllic to one person, while it sounds like a claustrophobic, goopy mess to another. Stress-management will help decrease cortisol production. In order for your body to make cortisol, progesterone is compromised in the process. If you engage in stress-reducing activities and some R&R, you will help save some of your progesterone.
  4. Catch enough Zzzz’s. Getting enough sleep will also lower your cortisol levels and keep your body regulated and in homeostasis. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-9 hours of sleep/night, with no one being an exception to how they operate or seem to succeed off less. Sleep is when our brains detoxify, our muscles recover, and our body rests and resets for the following day.

Foods For Estrogen Metabolism:

Here is a list of foods that can help metabolize estrogen and balance out your levels with progesterone. Estrogen is mainly metabolized in the liver and is then excreted through urine and feces.

  • Cruciferous vegetables (Wait a minute…I thought this was on the list for foods to eat for LOW ESTROGEN. Interestingly enough, cruciferous veggies can help those with low estrogen and those with high estrogen, as they act as both phytoestrogens and help estrogen metabolizers. Crazy paradox, right?). Here are some examples of cruciferous veggies.
    • broccoli
    • cauliflower
    • kale
    • arugula
    • watercress
    • cabbage
    • Brussel sprouts
  • ¬†Mushrooms
  • Red grapes
  • Red wine!
  • Seeds
  • Whole grains
  • Green tea
  • Pomegrantes¬†¬≤
  • Seaweed (nori) ¬≥
  • Shellfish
  • Coffee ‚Āī

Still confused whether you have low or high levels of estrogen? I get it, the signs and symptoms are very similar. Once again, it’s a great idea to get checked out before assuming; However, positive lifestyle changes such as getting more sleep, stress reduction and management, avoiding xenoestrogens, and exercising more can’t hurt. ūüėČ and don’t forget my favorite part- the foods you can add to your diet! I want you to focus on what you can add to benefit your health and energy levels rather than restricting anything. Let me know if you have any general questions.

P.S. I started my internship today, so only 952 hours until I’m through! haha and that much closer to being able to counsel you on a personal and customized level. Woohoo!

Next Up…

“Women Produce Testosterone Too”

References

  1. Healthline. 2020. Signs And Symptoms Of High Estrogen: Diagnosis, Treatment, And More. [online] Available at: <https://www.healthline.com/health/high-estrogen#causes&gt; [Accessed 20 July 2020].
  2. Healthline. 2020. 7 Foods For Lowering Estrogen Levels In Men. [online] Available at: <https://www.healthline.com/health/low-testosterone/anti-estrogen-diet-men&gt; [Accessed 20 July 2020].
  3. Jane Teas, Thomas G. Hurley, James R. Hebert, Adrian A. Franke, Daniel W. Sepkovic, Mindy S. Kurzer, Dietary Seaweed Modifies Estrogen and Phytoestrogen Metabolism in Healthy Postmenopausal Women,¬†The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 139, Issue 5, May 2009, Pages 939‚Äď944,¬†https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.108.100834
  4. Sisti JS, Hankinson SE, Caporaso NE, et al. Caffeine, coffee, and tea intake and urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(8):1174-1183. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0246