Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash

Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash

You know those meals that just taste like the season you’re in? Well, I know this dish doesn’t contain the popular kids at the moment (apples or pumpkins), but this Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash absolutely oozes autumnal flavors! The cranberries, sage and maple infuses the quinoa mixture that you then stuff the roasted acorn squash with- just heavenly! Did I mention I added cumin spiced ground turkey as a protein? Oh ya! This is optional, of course. I will definitely be making this again before fall is over, and I hope you enjoy it just as much as I do!

Servings: 4

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 40 minutes

Total time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 acorn squashes
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup dry quinoa (any color- I used tricolor)
  • 1/4 cup sliced yellow onion
  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • Fresh sage (about 10 leaves)
  • Sea salt
  • Black pepper
  • 1 tsp minced garlic (about 2 cloves)
  • 1 Tbsp cumin
  • 1 Tbsp vegan chicken-less seasoning from TJs (or a blend of sea salt, onion and garlic powder, turmeric, celery seed, ginger powder, and pepper)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup crumbled feta

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and lightly coat with oil.. Cut the very ends of each squash, but not too deep. This is meant to stabilize the squash to sit upright in the oven. Continue by cutting the squash in half, parallel to the cut you just made. Scoop out the middle with seeds- enough to stuff but not too much so you have enough squash to dig into!
  2. Brush the squash liberally with olive oil, then season with a few pinches of salt and grinds of black pepper.
  3. Roast for 40 minutes, or until a fork easily breaks the meat.
  4. While that’s cooking, bring a medium sized pot with 2 3/4 cups water to a boil. Rinse 1 cup quinoa then add to boiling water. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, or whatever the package instructions reads. Once done, drain in colander and transfer to a large bowl.
  5. Warm 1 large sautƩ pan over medium heat. Add 1 Tbsp olive oil. When warmed, add the sliced onions. Cook for 3-4 minute before adding the ground turkey, followed by the cumin, chicken-less seasoning (or alternative), and cinnamon. Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Cook for about 7-8 minutes (or when turkey is nearly cooked but not completely), stirring occasionally.
  6. Add the sliced (chiffonade) sage, cranberries and garlic. Let cook for 2-3 minutes longer.
  7. Add this turkey mixture in the quinoa, along with 2 tsp maple syrup. Mix well.
  8. When the acorn squash is done. Remove from the oven. Stuff each squash with quinoa mix. Crumble feta on top of each before serving (I also added a few pieces of fresh sage for an elevated kick!), and you’ve got yourself an amazing fall dish!

*NOTE* Acorn squash vary in size, and the room you have for the quinoa mixture also depends on the hole you scooped. If the well is smaller then you’d like, add some quinoa mixture on the side for more bites! Omgosh it’s soooo good. Bon Appetit!

Pumpkin Turkey Chili

Pumpkin Turkey Chili

This is my all-time favorite fall recipe, as it’s a twist on a classic and serves as delicious comfort food. I used this original recipe from Larissa Another Day blog and put my own twist on it (along with J.P.’s influence). I’ve been making it every fall, at least 2-3 times per season, for the last 6 years now. The pumpkin puree and spices are very subtle, so they don’t alter the traditional chili flavor profile too much. If anything, they ADD creaminess and warmth to the dish. I hope you enjoy it as much as we do!

Servings: 4

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 70 minutes

Total time: 75 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 chopped yellow onion
  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 Tbsp cumin powder
  • 1 Tbsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp pumpkin spice
  • 1 cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 1 cup bone broth
  • 1 can kidney beans
  • 1 can pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup hot sauce
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • Optional toppings: sour cream, goat cheese (or another variety), chopped jalapeƱos, cilantro, green onions

Instructions

  1. Warm a large stock pot over medium heat. Add olive oil, followed by the chopped yellow onion. Toss to coat and cook for 2 minutes.
  2. Add ground turkey and spices. Cook for 6 more minutes, or until turkey is nearly cooked (but not all the way). Occasionally break up and stir.
  3. Add halved grape tomatoes (or can of diced tomatoes). Cook for 2 minutes, stirring as needed.
  4. Add the bone broth, kidney beans, pumpkin puree, and hot sauce. Stir until combined. Bring to a boil then simmer, covered, for 60 minutes.
  5. Serve 1 cup with toppings of choice (goat cheese is incredible!), then sprinkle with black pepper.
  6. Cozy up, put on a fall flick, and enjoy every bite!

Let me know what you think please! I value your feedback on my work and recipes, as I want to grow and adapt as needed. Thank you for the follow and read!

All my best, ā¤ Danielle

Balancing Hormones

The phrase “balance your hormones” is trending right now, but which hormones are people referring to? I must acknowledge that this popular go-to phrase may be used for a few reasons:

  1. People aren’t familiar with different hormones and their functions, and that’s okay!
  2. Some cases may very well be referring to most of their hormones.

I felt compelled to write this piece because I had to clear the air and pronounce that not all hormones are interconnected and not all hormones need to be balanced! You may have low or elevated levels of one hormone, while another is within the normal range. However, left untreated, an imbalance of one hormone can very well impair other endocrine glands (organs that secrete hormones).

Let’s backtrack to what hormones are. Hormones are chemical messengers that deliver job duties to other parts of the body to carry out. For example, the hormone ghrelin signals hunger and when we need to eat, while leptin is the satiety hormone that tells us when we’re full. Yep. Not all hormones are related to our reproductive system or make us crazy!

So, I’m wondering if we need to change the dialogue from uber general and switch it up. If you’re stressed, maybe recognize that cortisol is the hormone you need to balance. If you have PCOS and acne, perhaps androgens are the culprit. If you don’t know, once again, that’s okay! That’s what medical professionals went to school for, but definitely consult with a professional (whether that’s a gastroenterologist, a functional medical doctor, a Registered Dietitian, etc. They can actually measure your hormones through a blood or urine sample and educate you on what hormones need some TLC.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. Do you think I’m being hypercritical of the phrase, or do you also think we need to adjust our verbiage when saying we need to balance our hormones?

Caramel Apple Muffins

Caramel Apple Muffins

Caramel apples are so nostalgic for me, as I’m sure they are for many of you. As a kid, I remember the air start to cool. When that happened, those caramel apples in the plastic containers would start lining the produce stands at the grocery store. Man, I loved those things- with peanuts and without.

Well, it’s fall again, and just because we’re no longer those kids begging our parents for that caramel treat, you can get whip up these delicious muffins that deliver the same flavor profile. And guess what? They are healthy! These babies contain only natural sugars provided by the dates and apples in them. There are a few prep steps, so I hope you don’t mind and love these fall babes as much as I do!

Yields: 12

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cook time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 1/2 cups almond flour
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground clove
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 Tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking soda

Wet Ingredients

  • 1 cup packed medjool dates, about 13-15 depending not the size (instructions on how to make the date syrup below, or you can buy date syrup instead!)
  • 1/4 cup date water (if you use date syrup, just add regular ‘ole water)
  • 1/4 cup ghee (or butter, but I used ghee, and YUM!)
  • 3 eggs

Other

  • 2 medium apples
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • Optional: 1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. If using walnuts, toast for 10 minutes then let cool.
  2. Next, remove the pits from the medjool dates. Boil water and pour over dates to soak for 20 minutes.
  3. While those are soaking, add the oats to a blender or food processor and pulse until a flour forms (should be only 15-30 seconds).
  4. Add all of the dry ingredients to a large bowl and whisk until mixed well.
  5. Add the eggs to a separate smaller bowl and whisk. Add the ghee and 1/4 cup of the water the dates were soaking in. Stir then pour on top the dry ingredients.
  6. Use a rubber spatula to mix until all of the dry ingredients combine with the wet ingredients (double check the bottom, where the extra flour tends to hide).
  7. If the dates are ready, blend only the dates in a blender. Add 1/8 cup of the date water and blend until it forms a caramel.
  8. Put aside. Heat up a sautƩ pan over medium heat . Add 1 Tbsp olive oil, add diced (small) apples, and sprinkle generously with cinnamon. Stir, cover and let cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally or as needed.
  9. Now you can add the walnuts (if you used), apples, and date caramel to the mix! Fold in well with rubber spatula- the date is where the sweetness comes from, so you want it to be evenly distributed.
  10. Oil or line the muffin tin. Use 1/3 measuring cup to add batter in wells. Level out the top of each and bake for 30 minutes.
  11. Cool for 15 minutes, and you have yourself some caramel apple muffins!

Fun tip! You can just make the date caramel to dip apples in as a healthy alternative snack snack!

Dry ingredients

Dry Ingredients

Apple Pie Granola

Apple Pie Granola

I developed a version of this recipe in my undergrad program as an exercise to share with children and their parents. What better time than fall to reintroduce an improved version of this apple pie granola?! It honestly tastes like fall and wafts cinnamon throughout your house- amazing and the perfect cozy breakfast or treat! Did I mention it only requires 6 simple & affordable ingredients?!

Ingredients
šŸ”ø2 red apples, cubed (size of die)
šŸ”ø1 cup rolled oats
šŸ”ø1-2 tsp cinnamon
šŸ”ø1/4 tsp fine sea salt
šŸ”ø1 1/2 Tbsp honey (or agave/maple syrup)
šŸ”ø1 tsp olive oil

šŸ”øOptional: add raw almonds or pecans for a crunch factor midway through baking!! And top your choice of yogurt to make a parfait!

Instructions
1. Preheat oven to 350F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. Add all 6 ingredients in 1 bowl. Mix well (especially so salt doesn’t clump in one area!)
3. Place mix spread out on lined baking sheet.
4. Bake for 20 minutes, stirring midway through.
5. Remove from oven and let cool for 5-10 minutes.
6. Enjoy as is or make an Apple Pie Sundae with yogurt!

P.S. Refrigerate if you don’t eat immediately to save safely for later.

Please let me know what you think. Enjoy! Happy fall, y’all!

5 Nutrients That Support Your Menstrual Phase

5 Nutrients That Support Your Menstrual Phase

Let me be clear. All nutrients are beneficial and serve their purpose at different times. I am also a big proponent of individualized nutrition based on what a person’s specific needs are. With that said, these 5 nutrients are my personal findings and round up of what can help most women with various symptoms during their menstrual phase.

Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral that has been shown to reduce symptoms for both PMS and menopause. During your luteal and menstrual phases, a magnesium supplement, foods rich in magnesium, and even magnesium oil or lotion can help relax the smooth muscles of your uterus, decrease inflammatory prostaglandins (the hormone-like lipids that cause contractions and cramps), reduce headaches and breast tenderness, and even help curb sugar cravings.

In terms of hormonal balance, magnesium is needed for the production of TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone, which is responsible for your body’s metabolism. In addition, it aids in blood sugar balance and estrogen detoxification. Women with PCOS are 19 times more likely to be magnesium-deficient, and those with diabetes or an autoimmune disease are also at high risk for deficiency.

Women want to aim for 400mg of magnesium per day.

Here are some food sources rich in magnesium:Ā 

  • pumpkin seeds
  • almonds
  • spinach
  • cashews
  • soymilk
  • black beans
  • edamame
  • dark chocolate

As for supplements, magnesium in the forms of aspartate, citrate, lactate, and chloride are more bioavailable and readily absorbed than magnesium oxide and sulfate. I was just recommended magnesium oil from Ancient Minerals and will report back after a few months of using it.

Omega 3s

Omega 3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties that can help with bloating, uterine inflammation, migraines, and even mood swings. In a study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome and irregular periods, an omega 3 supplement was given at 3g/day for 8 weeks. This resulted in decreased elevated testosterone and androgen levels with a regulation of menses in the omega 3 group.

In another study, women took 1,000mg of fish oil/day. The experimental group reported less menstrual pain than the comparative group who took the pain reliever, ibuprofen.

Here are some food sources rich in omega-3s:Ā 

  • fish (salmon, tuna, herring, sardines, and mackerel)
  • nuts and seeds
  • fortified foods (I have been using this Silk oat, almond, and pea milk blend infused with DHA omega-3s!)

Zinc

Supplementing with 30mg of zinc 1-3x daily during your luteal and menstrual phases can significantly reduce (if not manage or eradicate dysmenorrhea- period pain!). Zinc can also block androgen production, such as testosterone, which helps in treating acne and reducing excess facial hair.

Here are some food sources rich in zinc:Ā 

  • oysters
  • shellfish (crab and lobster)
  • red meat (I recommend organic, grass fed and pasture-raised)
  • legumes
  • nuts and seeds- especially pumpkin seeds!
  • eggs
  • whole grains

B vitamins, specifically B6 and B12

It’s a toss up between which B vitamin is more important to focus on. Both B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 (cobalamin) can help reduce feelings of anxiety and depression, which as we know can be rampant during our luteal and menstrual phases. Here are the main contributors of each.

B6 can help regulate periods, so if your cycle is irregular, I would recommend incorporating foods that contain more of this B vitamin. B6 also helps minimize bloating and has the ability to produce amino acids, which is needed more during your bleed for replenishment and to avoid muscle catabolism.

Here are some food sources rich in B6:Ā 

  • pork.
  • poultry, such asĀ chickenĀ or turkey
  • some fish (cod, salmon, halibut, trout, tuna and snapper)
  • peanuts
  • soyĀ beans
  • wheatgerm
  • oats
  • bananas

B12 largely contributes to red blood cell formation, which is also crucial during this time.Since we are losing blood and iron, new red blood cells are needed to help carry oxygen throughout the body and keep energy levels high.

Here are some food sources rich in B12:Ā 

  • meat
  • poultry
  • fish
  • eggs milk

Iron

Last but not least is iron. About 70% of our body’s iron is found in red blood cells. When we bleed during menses, we lose blood and, therefore, red blood cells and iron. It is important to replenish this mineral, as to avoid iron depletion or anemia. Women need approximately 1.8 mg of iron/day. If you donate blood, you lose about 200 mg of iron, and those breastfeeding and postpartum can lose up to 700 mg. Breastfeeding mamas need to increase their iron intake by 0.5-1mg/day.

P.S. Iron is better absorbed in the company of vitamin C, so add peppers, citrus juice, broccoli or tomatoes to your meals with iron-containing foods. Using iron pots can also increase iron levels! We only absorbed 10-30% of iron, so keep that in mind when measuring and accounting for your food.Ā 

Here are some food sources rich in iron:Ā 

  • lean beef
  • veal
  • poultry
  • pork
  • lamb
  • liver
  • fish and shellfish
  • greens
  • tofu
  • lima beans
  • legumes and lentils

Summary

Upping your nutrient consumption game is a great strategy in preventing or treating PMS and menstrual symptoms. From the abundance of research I’ve been doing lately on women’s health (specifically nutrition and phases of the cycle), I found magnesium, omega 3s, zinc, B vitamins (B6 + B12), and iron to be some of the most crucial in alleviating unwanted cramps, headaches, lethargy, acne and more while also replenishing the body with the fuel it needs to process and recover best.

If you have basic nutrition questions, I can answer those for you, but hang on tight for when I become licensed in February to better serve your personal needs. Xo Danielle

Disclaimer:Ā TheĀ medical/healthĀ information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind ofĀ medical/healthĀ advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITEĀ OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATIONĀ IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

 

How to Start Cycle Syncing

I discussed what cycle syncing was in my last post, but now I’m sure you’re wondering how to get started. Here are my top 5 tips on how to live according to your cycle without overcomplicating things.

  1. Read Alisa Vitti’s “In the Flo” book. This book is what sparked my interest in women’s health and biohacking your hormones .It’s a fairly easy read and account of how women are neglected in terms of diet and exercise advice compared to men (which many studies are based on). *hard eye roll*
  2. Take up seed cycling.Ā Seed cycling is eating sunflower seeds and sesame seeds during your luteal and menstrual phases (the week before and of your period) and eating pumpkin and flax seeds during your follicular and ovulatory phases. These seeds contain phytoestrogens and other specific micronutrients that support your hormones during these phases. It is recommended to eat these seeds raw and to consume 1-2 Tbsp/day. *more on this in an upcoming post
  3. Exercise according to each phase.
    • Follicular phase: cardio
    • Ovulatory phase: HIIT, weight lifting, circuits
    • Luteal phase: pilates, yoga
    • Menstruation: walking, restorative yoga (Yoga With Adrienne on YouTube has a killer Yoga for Women sequence that helps ease cramps!)

*Each phase fluctuates in estrogen and progesterone levels, ultimately providing different levels of energy. This guide can help you give your body the grace and movement it thrives off of during each phase. Note: afternoon workouts are best as to avoid spiking cortisol levels.

4.Ā Eat more whole foods in general. If you read “In the Flo”, you’ll notice that nearly all of the foods recommended are whole foods. Whole foods contain more fiber, active enzymes, antioxidants, and micronutrients that support your reproductive and overall health. Aim to consume 2-3 fruits per day and 3-4 veggies/day, along with whole food proteins, healthy fats, and whole grains. *Those with PCOS or endometriosis should consult with a Registered Dietitian to set up a plan specific to their needs.

5. Eat or drink 1 fermented food per day!Ā Good gut health impacts nearly every other bodily system. 80% of our immune cells are found within the GI tract. Eating healthy fats can result in glowing skin for our integumentary system, and a diverse microbiome encourages regular bowel movements. The list goes on and on. In relation to reproductive health, when gut health is rich in diversity, the estorbolome (what regulates estrogen) is also balanced and can maintain normal levels of this sex hormone. If the estrobolome is disrupted with dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) and inflammation, it strains its efficiency to maintain estrogen homeostasis.

Summary

Cycle syncing can be as simple or complex as you make it. I started out with these 5 changes listed above before diving into eating specific foods for each phase. With the stresses of everyday life, it can be difficult to take on new challenges and create new habits. Believe me, I know. Take on what amount is right for you, and remember, small changes add up!

What questions do you have? Leave a comment or message me on Instagram to discuss if you’d like. Happy syncing!

An Intro to Cycle Syncing

Hello! I realize that while I introduced cycle syncing on my Instagram account, I have yet to dedicate an entire post to it on my blog. For those of you who are not familiar, cycle syncing is coordinating your diet, exercise, and other lifestyle regimens along with your menstrual cycle and its 4 phase components (follicular, ovulatory, luteal, and menstrual). The idea is to “balance” your hormones in order to create homeostasis throughout your body, lessen unfavorable side effects (such as mood swings, cramps, headaches, etc.), and optimize your energy and potential!

Did you know that hormones affect more than just your reproductive system? Hormones are what control our appetite, metabolism, blood sugar, blood pressure, and many other bodily functions. They are essentially chemical messengers that activate other activities within the body, which is why it is so important for them to be produced and secreted within their appropriate levels. Diet and exercise can help with this, hence, cycle syncing.

“Cycle syncing” is a term that was coined by Alisa Vitti, author of Woman Code and In the Flo. She is a functional nutritionist, Holistic Health Counselor (HHC), and member of the American Association of Drugless Practitioners (AADP). In other words, she knows her stuff. Alisa is the founder of FLOLiving and runs a virtual practice. She, in conjunction with other women’s health practitioners, have initiated this liberation and revolution of women speaking freely and openly about their cycles and hormones. We should be encouraging one another to live in sync with our bodies and cycles.

Does cycle syncing work?

While there are no specific studies on cycle syncing as a cohesive practice, eating specific foods and altering the type of exercises done in accordance with your menstrual phases has shown promising results. For example, ground and raw flaxseed meal contains phytoestrogens that have shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer due to its mild estrogenic effects. In addition, multiple studies have been done in relation to exercise and the menstrual cycle. While there are not always significant differences between phases, the mid-luteal (the week leading up to your period) has displayed a decrease in performance in the heat among athletes.

The short of it is that cycle syncing is still being researched as a tried and true practice; However, a healthy and balanced diet along with a change in various exercises isn’t going to harm anyone in the meantime. With that said, please work with a professional while changing your diet if you have a medical condition or if you are looking to lose weight or balance your hormones.

I hope you enjoyed this quick snippet of an intro on cycle syncing! Stay tune for detailed info on my next post “Cycle Syncing 101”.

The Vanishing Period

This is the story of losing and regaining my period. I am sharing this tale in the hopes that my story will resonate with a friend or follower who currently doesn’t experience her monthly bleed. I challenge that woman to take an interest in reclaiming that power and health. You can also read along if you’re simply interested, for whatever reason. šŸ˜‰

The Beginning

My first “visit” arrived in the 5th or 6th grade. I really can’t pinpoint my age, but I do remember calling for my mom from the bathroom while still sitting on the toilet. “Mom, I got my period!”. She entered the room, looked at me sympathetically and said, “Okay, no big deal!”, then handed me a pad. I know she was just trying to make me feel comfortable, but I couldn’t help feeling awkward and unsure about becoming a “woman”. Little did I know I wouldn’t become a “woman” again until I was nearly 30…

The Vanishing

As far as I remember, I had normal, light periods throughout junior high and high school. Although, I’d be surprised if I didn’t experience anovulation (sporadic missed periods due to not ovulating) here and there. Fast forward to late college though- I’m managing a salon, attending classes full-time, and paying private out-of-pocket tuition all by myself. I wasn’t sleeping well, maybe 4-5 hours a night at best. On top of all of this, I was barely eating. I recall going through a phase of only consuming 1 plain packet of oatmeal for breakfast (made with water), working a 12 hour shift, then maybe having a snack before bed. I was starved and stressed, and so was my reproductive system (the last thing on my mind at the time).

This chronic stress caused me to develop hypothalamic amenorrhea (the absence of your period for 3+ months due to hypothalamus insufficiencies). I didn’t think much about my missing period. Heck, I thought it was kind of awesome not getting one in my early 20s. I didn’t have to buy tampons, so I saved money there. I also escaped the monthly woes of the dreaded bleed, including mood swings, cramps, breakouts, cravings, etc. Bonus points for not having to worry about it interfering with sex! Hey-o! Not getting a period was great, or so I thought.

A Story Within a Story

I met my husband in the winter of 2011. We did long distance from Chicago to Nashville for about a year, and then I moved to Tennessee to be with him. In the following years, I started training for marathons. Boy did I love running and the stress release it provided. In fact, I still do. When training for and running my first marathon, I could barely finish due to under fueling. I was incredibly tired and drained. Plus, my recovery was killer from the lack of nutrients and depletion. I’m actually shocked I didn’t injure myself that first training cycle, especially because amenorrhea can have adverse effects on bone density (something I wasn’t aware of or cared about at the time).

As my training and experience progressed throughout my 9 marathon training cycles, I came to realize that I was not going to get faster without proper fueling. This realization, a couple of injuries, and the desire to recover from my eating disorder made me dive deep into nutrition research, Ā purchase my favorite “Run Fast. Eat Slow.” cookbook, and it even inspired me to major in nutrition & dietetics! šŸ™‚

I proceeded to learn how to properly fuel my body and ALL of its systems with what it needs- macro + micronutrient- wise. I gained a bit of weight, and guess what? I ran my fastest race and qualified for the Boston Marathon! In April 2019, I PRed at Boston with a 3:21.. Do you know what else? I had regained my period a couple of years prior leading up to that, which I attribute to my bone health, injury prevention, hormonal balance, increased energy levels, a quicker recovery time and improved athletic performance. Regaining my period was a blessing in disguise, and I never take its presence for granted now. Here’s more info on Why You Shouldn’t Dread Your Period, and to even embrace it for what it’s doing for you, your overall health, and your ability to conceive if you so wish.

The Takeaway

What I have learned from my hypothalamic amenorrhea was that just because it didn’t appear to be doing damage, the absence of a period can cause long-term health consequences. These consequences include, but are not limited to: infertility, osteopenia or osteoporosis, thyroid issues, adrenal disorders, PCOS, and hormonal imbalances. I was lucky that my running injuries were fairly minor and that I didn’t suffer any stress fractures. The plan is to get a DEXA scan to check my bone density. I’m hoping there is no serious damage or signs of onset osteopenia/osteoporosis.

While amenorrhea occurs naturally while pregnant and breastfeeding, it should be taken seriously as a health concern when caused by an eating disorder, extreme exercise, being underweight, medications, stress, and sometimes birth control (among other causes). Many OBGYNs claim that there is nothing wrong with the absence of a period while on birth control, but I strongly suggest that you educate yourself on how birth control works and what that means for your body. For example, hormonal birth control suppresses ovulation (an entire phase of your cycle) and therefore induces a “withdrawal bleed” during your placebo week. In other words, you are not getting a real period on birth control. This is something to think about.

My last message about amenorrhea is to not take it lightly like I did in my early 20s. Having the mentality that you are saving money on sanitary products, avoiding period symptoms, and changing the game with your lifestyle and sex schedule can be detrimental and negligent to your long-term health. I know it is difficult to adopt a new perspective after learning new information, but I promise you it’s worth the investment in yourself and your health. If anything, do me a favor and educate yourself, continue to learn, then make changes that are right for you and your body.

Please feel free to reach out without questions regarding amenorrhea, and check out my previous post, “I Don’t Have a Period. Now What?“.

 

Disclaimer: TheĀ medical/healthĀ information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional advice. Accordingly, before taking any actions based upon such information, we encourage you to consult with the appropriate professionals. We do not provide any kind ofĀ medical/healthĀ advice. THE USE OR RELIANCE OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED ON THIS SITEĀ OR OUR MOBILE APPLICATIONĀ IS SOLELY AT YOUR OWN RISK.

 

 

I Don’t Have a Period. Now What?

Since I started sharing content on reproductive health, I have had several people reach out asking how to cycle sync if they don’t get their period. Good question!

The short answer is that while not impossible, it is difficult to cycle sync and see optimal results without getting your period. Our bodies are wired to communicate its needs, and knowing which phase you’re in is really important and valuable in providing our bodies what they need at a specific time.

The long answer is that amenorrhea (absence of a period) can be caused by a variety of things- low energy intake, overexercising, stress, and birth control (just to name a few). Despite the cause, the goal should be to regain your period. Period.

For those undereating and/or overexercising, the next step is to consume adequate calories + essential nutrients while taking a break from aggressive activity. Don’t worry. This is just temporary until you regain adequate nutrition and maybe weight to support your reproductive system.

RED-S (Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport) is very common in athletes due to diet culture and the false belief that the thinner you are, the better you will perform. This is WRONG! And RED-S and amenorrhea puts you at higher risk of injury and osteoporosis. Fun fact: I ran my best marathon after gaining weight and my period back after 4 years of its absence!

For those on birth control, you can eat and exercise according to your birth control’s placebo week (which should be when your hormones drop and you menstruate). You count the days of each phase from there. However, talk to your doctor and OB of other bc options if you’re concerned about an absent period. Once again, I recommend that every premenopausal woman experience their period for optimal overall health.

Follow these steps to gain knowledge and power over your amenorrhea. šŸ‘‡

šŸ’„ See your primary care physician & OBGYN.

šŸ’„ Get your hormone levels tested.

šŸ’„ Get blood work done.

šŸ’„ Track xenoestrogens (toxic materials in cleaning + beauty/skin products) you’re exposing yourself to.

šŸ’„ Consume enough calories!

šŸ’„ Ease up on exercise if you’re overdoing it.

What questions do you have?